Mini Review #6: The Hate U Give

32075671The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (444 pages) was good. It took a long time for me to finish it because I just didn’t have the mental energy to read about something that happens constantly (to be exact the latest publicized case concerns Aries Carter).

Anyway, The Hate U Give reads like a dummy’s guide to police brutality, but I understand I’m not really the intended audience. I’m sure it opened the eyes of others.

I absolutely LOVED learning about Starr’s family. Seven was my favorite, I liked Kenya, and even DeVante was cool. I didn’t care too much for Starr’s school life and school friends. And I found Chris to be too cringe-worthy at times. The book could be a little cringy at times itself. Still, I enjoyed most of the characters, and the book remained very realistic even throughout the trauma Starr and others faced. It’s long but worth a read.

Monday: What I’m Reading Now 7/17/17

What’s up!

Things are going pretty well. I started watching El Chapulín (the animated version), and it’s funny and easy to understand. I’m finally learning a bunch of Spanish and getting more confident in my speaking too. Very excited about that! ¡Quiero ser bilingüe!

What I’m Reading Now:

31371228Posted by John David Anderson

I have read 21 pages so far. The beginning’s interesting and I look forward to reading more. Sometimes, stories set in (American) high schools get overdone and terribly cliche, so a story set in middle school is almost a fresh breath of air.

 

 

 

What I Read Last Week:

32671347Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: The Road to Epoli by Ben Costa & James Parks (208 pages)

Nice little surprise worth reading perhaps a bit confusing at times. Wonderful artwork!

 

 

 

 

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Kidlit version hosted by Kellee Moye of Unleashing Readers and Jen of Teach Mentor Texts; original version hosted by Kathryn at Book Date.

 

 

Book Review #25: Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo– The Road to Epoli

What’s up, guys! This was a delightful read. More than ever it makes me really want to publish my first book. This one’s going to be pretty short, almost like a mini review.

32671347STORY:

“You are someone, Rickety Stitch. That much I know.”

Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: The Road to Epoli by Ben Costa & James Parks (208 pages) is about Rickety, a free-thinking skeleton who comically misses the point and has some disturbing dreams. Recently through a haunting song that stirs up memories in Rickety’s head and after being fired from a dungeon-keeper job, he decides to go on a journey to discover who/what he was before a singing skeleton.

I hadn’t expected too much out of this story besides some awesome art, but I found the story kind of heartwarming. To be honest not too much happens in this book. I will say it’s a great set up because I am eager for the second book.

CHARACTERS:

Continue reading “Book Review #25: Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo– The Road to Epoli”

Book Review #24: Genius: The Game

30532527This book needed some mayonnaise or BBQ sauce because it was dry!

STORY:

“Cameras are eyes… Microphones are ears… (pg 294)”

In Genius: The Game by Leopoldo Gout (320 pages), Rex Huerta’s a regular sixteen-year-old boy who has a knack (and need) for hacking. Unfortunately, his parents are at risk for being deported from the U.S, Teo, his older brother, has run away from home, and school isn’t much fun for him. With all these things weighing on Rex’s shoulders, the announcement of the genius Kiran’s youth-hacking competition sounds promising, not to mention he needs a quantum computer. Of course, Rex’s internet hacker friends Tunde and Painted Wolf are going to be there for their own reasons.

This book needed more detail. To know a character is “tall, thin, and broad-shouldered (pg 125)” is not enough for me! Does the character have dimples, sunken in cheekbones, and are their clothes loose or ironed to perfection? These are the things I want to know!

The visuals like the diagrams, drawings, and photographs were a nice aesthetic, but they felt like a crutch sometimes.

Also, Rex’s—actually, everyone’s— narrative was dry. And there were too many info-dumps that could’ve been weaved into the story better.

There’s a little attraction between Rex and Cai (Painted Wolf). I mean they were alright. Depending on how old Kiran was, I liked him with her better if only for the Batman/Catwoman angle.

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CHARACTERS:

This book has a bunch of diverse characters! Yay! The three main leads are respectively Mexican, Nigerian, and Chinese! Within the Genius competition, there are South Americans, Egyptians, South Africans, and Haitians and others.

Still, I had no favorite character.

Rex is okay, I guess. But he doesn’t really have a personality. He just reacts to the things that happen around him.

“I do not like the term junk. It implies inherent uselessness and I have come to find that nothing is inherently useless. It is only a matter of finding the time, functionality, and place of the object” (pg 40).

I did like Tunde the most due to his sense of wonderment. I didn’t mind his not-translated Nigerian lingo because I could figure out most of it from context.

Cai (Painted Wolf) was supposed to be this baddie/vigilante chick that I just did not get or care about.

Kiran was interesting just a smidge.

OVERALL:

I’m sorry guys but I could not wait for this book to be over. It took me 9 days to finish this because I had to force myself. It was almost a DNF, but I hoped it would get better.

Not a bad idea but I wished it could have been executed differently (and with more detail)! I might read the sequel.

Book Review #20: The Saga of Rex

7890024Okay, this was cuter than expected. Also, no quote this time because this book is 98% no text.

STORY:

In The Saga of Rex by Michel Gagné (200 pages), basically, a frog-like God of some alternative universe akin to Noah’s ark created and paired animals together (the beginning had me confused but who cares). Also, somehow the God collected/teleported real creatures to the world. Anyway, Rex, a cute little fox creature, got teleported to the weird world and was paired with a purple-shapeshifting squirrel-fox, Aven. Rex doesn’t have a clue about his new surroundings, but he just wants to follow his new mate.

I hadn’t expected there to be such a violent part in the book (a creature was about to be sacrificed, a creature was pierced through the stomach with a bloody knife, and a creature died), but it was okay because nothing stayed too sad for long.

ART:

The art was very beautiful! There’s a climatic part when Rex loses a unicorn horn that is just mesmerizing to see. When Rex and his mate become one (nothing vulgar or sexual; kids won’t even pick up on the symbolism) was another beautiful part. I loved the color direction in this book as well.

CHARACTERS:

Rex was an absolute cutie and Aven seemed to be a lot of fun.

OVERALL:

To sum this book up, it’s message was “travel all you can with the one you love.” Or maybe it was really “this book was kind of weird and I didn’t understand most of it, but I loved the pictures.” Either way, it’s worth picking up! I found the ending so sweet.

Mini Review #4: SuperMutant Magic Academy

22752445STORY:

“That’s not real life. Not everything has a moral or is tied up neatly with a bow” (pg 168).

In SuperMutant Magic Academy by Jillian Tamaki (274 pages), some of the comics were funny, morbid, and/or philosophical. I didn’t particularly like this series because it felt too edgy or a bit tryhard and a lot of the characters’ personalities were horrid (which is actually realistic because people in real life can be horrible).

I couldn’t stand Marsha but unrequited love is pretty sad. Frances the art student, on the other hand, was hilarious!

ART:

The illustrations are loose and lackadaisical, a perfect portrayal of the average high school student.

OVERALL:

I like dark humor sometimes but I just wasn’t thrilled with it in this book. You might think differently though, so check it out!