Mini Review: #8 Not Now, Not Ever

33602144It’s been a million years or at least a frozen period of time since a review.

College has really turned up (not turnt up; there’s a subtle difference :p) the difficulty level in some classes.

Anyway, this review is based on the ARC (Advance Reader Copy), which I won in a Goodreads giveaway. This book comes out November 21st!

Also, I have never seen/read Much Ado about Nothing so even though this is a retelling of it, I was new to it all… 😛

STORY:

“I took in a breath so deep that it burned the back of my throat, killing a sob before it could start. I could taste the eucalyptus baked into my sweater” (pg 90).

Perhaps, not the best quote to start a review with, but it embodies the wonderfully quirky vibe of this book well. Also, I really love the trivia/language/sci-fi bits that are constantly present.

The premise of  Not Now, Not Ever by Lily Anderson (320 pages) is about a teen going to a genius camp with elimination games as a way to win a scholarship to her dream college. This college is important for Elliot Garboche to take control of her destiny instead of being pigeonholed into to enlisting in the army like her mother or becoming a lawyer like her father and step-mother desire her to be. Of course, Ever can’t let her overbearing family members know her true intentions to break away from the mold, so she lies and goes to the camp under the guise of Ever Lawrence. Getting into the camp was easy but staying is harder than ever!

The romance is in the background and any progress between Ever and Brandon is slow. Depending on who you are, that might be a great quality this story exhibits. For me, I don’t mind the slow start and the focus on the camp itself, but the romance isn’t aww-worthy (i.e. no fangirling moments).

Well… The first kiss scene was incredibly cheesy, but the line, “He smiled. ‘I really like you, Elliot” warmed my little young adult heart.

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CHARACTER:

This book has some nice diversity considering the genius camp has contestants from every race and background. For example, the main character Ever has significant Creole ancestry.

Eh, my first impression of Elliot (better known as Ever) was a bit prickly. I thought she was a little combative against a counselor named Cornell in their first meeting. Throughout the story, lowkey Ever needed to mind her own business. What’s it to you that someone didn’t solve a Rubik’s cube? Anyway, she was mad intrusive and a bit judgemental, though the latter is a very common realistic trait she wasn’t a character that I actually liked. I think the reason that particular personality trait turned me off is because I try my hardest not to assume things about people (despite it being a knee-jerk human behavior).

However, I like that Ever was very confident about herself especially being a tall girl who did martial arts and loved sci-fi books, especially Octavia Butler.

The rest of the cast never really stood out to me. I’m sure others will connect with the quirky, competitive array of characters, but I was not personally invested in them.

OVERALL:

“Do you ever miss things before they’re over?” (pg 174)

It’s certainly worth a read. Not Now, Not Ever is also a fun way to learn a bunch of cool trivia with a tiny bit of mystery and romance.

The ending also had a good dash of realism because sometimes YA-fiction, in general, can end either downright angsty or too fairytale happily-ever-after-ish.

 

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Book Review: #27 Reindeer Boy

Okay, this was silly but super cute. I believe it’s an OEL (Original English Language [manga]), and it read like a shoujo.

30621322STORY:

Reindeer Boy by Cassandra Jean (192 pages) is about Quincy, a normal girl who has nubs growing out of her head. The arrival of a mysterious boy, Cupid, who has full-blown antlers growing out of his head takes not only Quincy’s school by surprise, but Quincy herself begins to take an interest in him. Of course, Cupid’s had his eyes set on her for a while now, much longer than Quincy ever anticipated. She meets his array of fellow antlered-companions and learns something new.

I really liked the Christmas-y spin on this story because I’ve never read anything reindeer-centered before. But I don’t get the point of the story. Was it about Quincy’s heritage (which was never really explained) or the romance?

ooo

CHARACTERS:

I have to say the characters are really flat even though Cupid’s pretty lovable in that celebrity I like but don’t know personally type of way. Okay, what was the deal with Conway, the childhood best friend (if you read shoujo, you know the childhood best friend almost never wins XD)? Why was Irena so flaky? Where was Quincy’s mom? Deceased? Divorced? Adopted?

Quincy is a cutie (especially, as a kid; yay, for her being a woc). I guess she was just a girl, curious and a lover of a photography. I couldn’t pinpoint her actual personality because I didn’t honestly see one. I supposed she was reserved.

Cupid, I liked the most. He was smug without being a flirty playboy. It’s really hard for some writers to have cocky characters that aren’t grating, and I’m glad Cupid’s one of the few likable ones.

I liked the Reindeer friends/family, but they weren’t too memorable though. Blitzen stood out to me since he so looked cool (reminded me of an action star).

Santa—Kris Kringle here— was very interesting, to say the least. He had like a one-page cameo.

ART:

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I adore the art! Everyone dresses like hipsters and the artwork’s done in the style of a generic shoujo manga or manwha. I think Cupid looks adorable and his hair is so fluffy.

Overall:

Yeah.

I would most definitely read a sequel. I enjoyed reading this a lot, and it’s sure to make someone smile. Give it a chance!

Mini Review #7: Eliza and Her Monsters

31931941“I do have friends. Maybe they live hundreds of miles away from me, and maybe I can only talk to them through a screen, but they’re still my friends. They don’t just hold Monstrous Sea together. They hold me together” (page 36).

Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesa Zappia (385 pages) is a nice change of pace from the usual plots YA fictions sometimes have.

I really liked it, and it was especially nice getting a narrative from a creator/artist. I was mad disappointed in Wallace toward the end. I hadn’t expected him to act that way since he seemed so understanding but boy was he a—Anyway, Eliza never tried to explain herself to her parents. She just always blew up. I can acknowledge there are times you tell your parents stuff, and it doesn’t stick as if your explanations dislodge from their brains and slide right out their ears. But Eliza’s mom and dad were honestly making an effort, a futile one, but an effort none the less. The last of Eliza’s family, her two younger brothers, I really loved. Sully and Church were so adorable. We weren’t shown too much of Church, but Sully was very vocal about his support of his sissy.

The romance squeezed in here wasn’t truly needed. And I know that sounds weird coming from me, but even if friendship was only prevalent I think this would have been just the same.

OVERALL:

It’s worth a read. But if tumblr, fandoms, Wattpad, and fan fiction turns you off there will be nothing for you to like here. Also, there’s a half-baked suicide attempt in this book because the way it was handled was a bit cheesy.

So yeah.  Not too much talk about fandom because it’s just here and there. But I think the average teenager would like this book. Three stars from me.

Mini Review #6: The Hate U Give

32075671The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (444 pages) was good. It took a long time for me to finish it because I just didn’t have the mental energy to read about something that happens constantly (to be exact the latest publicized case concerns Aries Carter).

Anyway, The Hate U Give reads like a dummy’s guide to police brutality, but I understand I’m not really the intended audience. I’m sure it opened the eyes of others.

I absolutely LOVED learning about Starr’s family. Seven was my favorite, I liked Kenya, and even DeVante was cool. I didn’t care too much for Starr’s school life and school friends. And I found Chris to be too cringe-worthy at times. The book could be a little cringy at times itself. Still, I enjoyed most of the characters, and the book remained very realistic even throughout the trauma Starr and others faced. It’s long but worth a read.

Monday: What I’m Reading Now 7/17/17

What’s up!

Things are going pretty well. I started watching El ChapulĂ­n (the animated version), and it’s funny and easy to understand. I’m finally learning a bunch of Spanish and getting more confident in my speaking too. Very excited about that! ÂĄQuiero ser bilingĂźe!

What I’m Reading Now:

31371228Posted by John David Anderson

I have read 21 pages so far. The beginning’s interesting and I look forward to reading more. Sometimes, stories set in (American) high schools get overdone and terribly cliche, so a story set in middle school is almost a fresh breath of air.

 

 

 

What I Read Last Week:

32671347Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: The Road to Epoli by Ben Costa & James Parks (208 pages)

Nice little surprise worth reading perhaps a bit confusing at times. Wonderful artwork!

 

 

 

 

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Kidlit version hosted by Kellee Moye of Unleashing Readers and Jen of Teach Mentor Texts; original version hosted by Kathryn at Book Date.