Book Review #30: The Edge of Everything

“‘Why endanger yourselves?’ he said. ‘Why do all this for me
Zoe looked down at where his hand lightly gripped her. She gave him a smile, a trace of light in the darkness.

‘There’s nothing good on TV,’ she said (page 87).”

29566060STORY:

The Edge of Everything by Jeff Giles (368 pages) has some good narrative(s) though a bit cringy at times. I enjoy the details embedded in the character’s personalities and movements.

“Zoe couldn’t help it; she took a photo to put on Instagram later (page 41).

For me, the bounty-hunter moments are the best parts. The entire supernatural element to bounty-hunting is just mad interesting, and the ordeal with a character named Stan was my favorite part.

At times, the story falls into “slice-of-life” moments such as Zoe and her mom not seeing eye-to-eye about her father’s death or caving, which is a huge part.

Now, a serious case of “instalove” is present in this book. AIN’T NO REASON X should’ve been that caught up and strung out on basic-behind Zoe that quickly. Perhaps, it is akin to baby chicks imprinting on the first image they see as their mother, but X was too into Zoe too fast.

This doesn’t mean I don’t like their little cliche romance, but it is worth noting.

CHARACTERS:

Zoe is bland but the stuff that happens around her is what’s interesting. Her friends, Dallas and Val, are much cooler.

Jonah, the little brother, is a little cinnamon roll. 😀

Bounty hunters seem really nice for this sort of story. Maybe too nice for me… I mean Zoe was talking to them like they couldn’t have snapped her neck into two at will. Here, bounty hunters are basically the grim reaper.

X is fine with me but his backstory seems a bit like a cop-out, so we don’t forget for a second his life’s not like the other morally-gray bounty hunters. Still, I liked his gentlemen-ly speech even if it didn’t feel consistent at times.

OVERALL:

Well, The Edge of Everything reeks of instalove, but it has me hooked enough to read the sequel. The story’s a bit of a slow burn but the plot twists keep readers engaged. It is worth a read, and you can tell early on whether you love/hate it.
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Book Review #29: The Last Black Unicorn

I think this is my first non-fiction review? So yeah!

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The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish (288 pages) is an interesting read or, better said, an interesting life story.

Be aware there’s a bunch of cursing and crude language, almost excessively. The appeal of the humor is all the messed-up/f’ed up junk that happened in Tiffany’s life. Oh my God. Sometimes, it got heavy. Nothing is politically-correct (disabled jokes, poop in shoes, etc) and a lot of trauma is present through carefully covert jokes.

But real life can’t be censored.

Anyway, I like the choppy, episodic chapters because it’s easy to put down and start reading again. Honestly, many of the sentences are written in AAVE, which is cool.

Three stars out of five!

 

Mini Review #10: The Battle for Amphibopolis (Nnewts #3)

33609902Let’s assume y’all have read the first two books in the trilogy.

STORY:

This is the conclusion of the Nnewts trilogy. It’s been a while since I first read the other books, but thankfully there are a few callbacks to previous moments so I got up to speed rather quickly. Was the pace a bit fast and did some things not get answered with complete clarity? Did the characters make asinine decisions? Well yeah, but I might still be on the fumes of finishing-a-series-joy, so I’m most likely overlooking it. I liked this book.

The Battle for Amphibopolis reminded me of the Bible, Lord of the Rings, and Harry Potter (tho I haven’t actually seen LoTR or HP) mixed into one.

I never thought a story with so many (permanent) deaths would leave me feeling satisfied. I mean if this were any other story, I would have been like

Come On Please GIF

The little dash of romance was sweet but not entirely believable due to the age range of the recipients. I think they were supposed to be like 12, and like I said before it’s been a while since I read the second book. But didn’t Herk only know her for like a few days?

Anyway, when I saw Herk’s parents in “heaven” so to speak, I started tearing up. I don’t know why, but it really had me in my feelings.

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CHARACTERS:

Herk is pretty much the same as before except this time he has to deal with trying to stall a Lizzard transformation.

Sissy had a less prominent role in this book. She got these great powers, but the potential for them just kind of fizzled out at the end.

Zerk was there as well. :p

I loved Launa and her father. Their relationship was heartwarming, and I enjoyed Launa’s strong determination so much. I mean she was tempted with a very strong thing, but she turned it down. Respect.

ART:

I like the cartoony style and the colorful singing geckos? lizards? were so cute. Nice color direction overall.

OVERALL:

This is a fun graphic novel series though admittedly very violent at times. I give this book 4 out of 5, but as for the series as a whole, I don’t know. I will just say it’s a good series and leave it at that.

Mini Review: #8 Not Now, Not Ever

33602144It’s been a million years or at least a frozen period of time since a review.

College has really turned up (not turnt up; there’s a subtle difference :p) the difficulty level in some classes.

Anyway, this review is based on the ARC (Advance Reader Copy), which I won in a Goodreads giveaway. This book comes out November 21st!

Also, I have never seen/read Much Ado about Nothing so even though this is a retelling of it, I was new to it all… 😛

STORY:

“I took in a breath so deep that it burned the back of my throat, killing a sob before it could start. I could taste the eucalyptus baked into my sweater” (pg 90).

Perhaps, not the best quote to start a review with, but it embodies the wonderfully quirky vibe of this book well. Also, I really love the trivia/language/sci-fi bits that are constantly present.

The premise of  Not Now, Not Ever by Lily Anderson (320 pages) is about a teen going to a genius camp with elimination games as a way to win a scholarship to her dream college. This college is important for Elliot Garboche to take control of her destiny instead of being pigeonholed into to enlisting in the army like her mother or becoming a lawyer like her father and step-mother desire her to be. Of course, Ever can’t let her overbearing family members know her true intentions to break away from the mold, so she lies and goes to the camp under the guise of Ever Lawrence. Getting into the camp was easy but staying is harder than ever!

The romance is in the background and any progress between Ever and Brandon is slow. Depending on who you are, that might be a great quality this story exhibits. For me, I don’t mind the slow start and the focus on the camp itself, but the romance isn’t aww-worthy (i.e. no fangirling moments).

Well… The first kiss scene was incredibly cheesy, but the line, “He smiled. ‘I really like you, Elliot” warmed my little young adult heart.

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CHARACTER:

This book has some nice diversity considering the genius camp has contestants from every race and background. For example, the main character Ever has significant Creole ancestry.

Eh, my first impression of Elliot (better known as Ever) was a bit prickly. I thought she was a little combative against a counselor named Cornell in their first meeting. Throughout the story, lowkey Ever needed to mind her own business. What’s it to you that someone didn’t solve a Rubik’s cube? Anyway, she was mad intrusive and a bit judgemental, though the latter is a very common realistic trait she wasn’t a character that I actually liked. I think the reason that particular personality trait turned me off is because I try my hardest not to assume things about people (despite it being a knee-jerk human behavior).

However, I like that Ever was very confident about herself especially being a tall girl who did martial arts and loved sci-fi books, especially Octavia Butler.

The rest of the cast never really stood out to me. I’m sure others will connect with the quirky, competitive array of characters, but I was not personally invested in them.

OVERALL:

“Do you ever miss things before they’re over?” (pg 174)

It’s certainly worth a read. Not Now, Not Ever is also a fun way to learn a bunch of cool trivia with a tiny bit of mystery and romance.

The ending also had a good dash of realism because sometimes YA-fiction, in general, can end either downright angsty or too fairytale happily-ever-after-ish.

 

Book Review #26: Posted

31371228STORY:

“Words are ghosts.”

Posted by John David Anderson (384 pages) is about how the removal of cell phones inadvertently causes the rise of sticky notes everywhere. The only thing is everything on the sticky notes aren’t always nice.

This book seemed to be a run-of-mill middle school cliche hierarchy story (much like those overdone high school stories), but it turned out to be a lot more clever. It covered how divorces affect kids differently, being an outcast, bullies, and popularity too. I was expecting cookies but got a cookie pizza instead. You know what I’m saying? Posted is a pleasant surprise.

CHARACTERS:

Continue reading “Book Review #26: Posted”

Monday: What I’m Reading Now 7/17/17

What’s up!

Things are going pretty well. I started watching El Chapulín (the animated version), and it’s funny and easy to understand. I’m finally learning a bunch of Spanish and getting more confident in my speaking too. Very excited about that! ¡Quiero ser bilingüe!

What I’m Reading Now:

31371228Posted by John David Anderson

I have read 21 pages so far. The beginning’s interesting and I look forward to reading more. Sometimes, stories set in (American) high schools get overdone and terribly cliche, so a story set in middle school is almost a fresh breath of air.

 

 

 

What I Read Last Week:

32671347Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: The Road to Epoli by Ben Costa & James Parks (208 pages)

Nice little surprise worth reading perhaps a bit confusing at times. Wonderful artwork!

 

 

 

 

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Kidlit version hosted by Kellee Moye of Unleashing Readers and Jen of Teach Mentor Texts; original version hosted by Kathryn at Book Date.